THE FAMILY NAME

Pages 25 - 30


(38)-JOSEPIIINE HILL

Third Generation
The fourth child of (5A)-Rebecca (Woodruff) and (5)-Labon Hill. She was born on the farm called Chestnut Orchard near Rockcastle, West Virginia, probably in 1837. She grew to womanhood here and married (38A)-Benjamin Bennett. They continued to live in this locality and had six children:

Fourth Generation

(151)-George, date of birth not known.
(152)-Wade Cross, born March 9, 1871.
(153)-Wilson (Wilk), date of birth not known.
(154)-Dudley, date of birth not known.
(155)-Mattie (Matt), date of birth not known.
(156)-Clintilly, date of birth not known.

(39)-CLARK HILL

Third Generation
The fifth child of (5A)-Rebecca (Woodruff) and (5)-Labon Hill. He was born on a farm called Chestnut Orchard near Rock­castle, West Virginia, October 13, 1839. He grew to manhood here, engaged in farming and married (39A)-Hannah E. Staats, April 19, 1863. He died November 2, 1870. He occupies a solitary grave on "High Knob" the highest eminence in Jackson or adjacent counties. They had four children:

Fourth Generation

(157)-Caroline, born April 1, 1864.
(158)-Elijah, born January 7, 1866.
(159)-Labon, born April 24, 1868.
(160)-Chapman C. (Chap), born August 23, 1870.

(40)-ELIJAH HILL

Third Generation
The sixth child of (5A)-Rebecca (Woodruff) and (5)-Labon Hill. He was born at Chestnut Orchard near Rockcastle, West Virginia, probably in 1844. In 1863 at the age of 18 he and his brother (41)-Enoch, two years younger, enlisted in the Union Army, Company "K" 13th West Virginia Volunteer Infantry. This military unit participated in the important Shehandoah Valley campaign. Often without supplies it was necessary for this army to live off the land, frequently going two or three days with out food. Elijah Hill left camp one night on a foraging errand and never returned. It is presumed he was captured by confederate soldiers and died in Andersonville or Libby prison. In an article submitted in either the Jackson or Putnam County History by Ada Ruth Sayre reports Elijah as a prisoner in Berryville, Virginia on August 20, 1864. He was reported to have died while a prisoner at Salisbury, North Carolina on December 16, 1864. After the close of the war, President Lincoln sent the family a medal which is now in the Elijah Hill family of Racine, Ohio. In the book, Volume XIV, Salisbury National Cemetery, North Carolina, Elijah is listed as having served in the 13th Virginia. The Salisbury North Carolina Confederate Civil War Prison & National Cemetery

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(41)-ENOCH HILL

Third Generation
The eighth child of (5A)-Rebecca (Woodruff) and (5)-Labon Hill. He was born on a farm called Chestnut Orchard near Rockcastle, Jackson County, West Virginia September 17, 1846. At the age of sixteen he and his brother (40)-Elijah, enlisted in the Union Army, Company "K" 13th West Virginia Volunteer Infantry. He served the last eighteen months of the Civil War. He took part in the Shenandoah Valley campaign and eight battles, including the battles of Winchester and Cedar. Creek.

At the close of the war he returned home and entered the ministry of the United Brethren Church. He married (41A)-Rachel Jane Kimberling of Union Township, Mason County. He acquired ownership of his father's home place which he sold to (35B)- Joshua Shinn, his brother-in-law. In 1876 they moved to Kansas where he continued in the ministry. He died December 22, 1928. Rachel Jane (Kimberling) Hill died January 6, 1914. Both are, buried at Nickerson, Reno County, Kansas. They had nine children:

Fourth Generation

(161)-Nancy, born about 1868.
(162)-Josephine, born about 1869 or 1870.
(163)-John, born about 1871.
(164)-Ward, born September 20, 1873 or 1874.
(165)-Odus Grant, born January 19, 1876.
(166)-Lela, born about 1877.
(167)-Mary, born April 27, 1878.
(168)-Ova May, born May 8, 1983.
(169)-Carl Enoch, born May 26, 1889.

(42)-IRA ELLIOT HILL

Third Generation
The *sixth child of (5A)-Rebecca (Woodruff) and (5)-Labon Hill. He was born at Chestnut Orchard, near Rockcastle, West Virginia in 1841 or 1842. He grew to manhood here and engaged in the show business. He owned and traveled with his show. He married (42A)--Nancy Absten whose maiden name was Peck.

In later life he bought a farm in Mason County, West Virginia near Leon, and lived the remaining years of his life there. Up to this time (1944) the farm still remains in the family. He died at the age of 49 and is buried on this farm as is his wife. They had one child:

Fourth Generation

(170)-David Elliot, born January 30, 1867.

*Later information shows Ira Hill was the sixth child

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(43)-ELIZABETH HIILL

Third. Generation
The ninth child of (5A)- Rebecca (Woodruff) and (5)-Labon Hill. She was born on a farm called Chestnut Orchard near Rockcastle, Jackson County, West Virginia about 1848 or 1849. She grew to womanhood here and married a (43A)-Mr. Taylor. After the apparently early death of Taylor she married a (43B)-Mr. Whitney. Later she married a (43C)-Mr. Lewis who, we believe, was the father of her three children, all of whom are now (1944) dead.

(44)-DANIEL HILL

Third Generation
The tenth child of (5A)-Rebecca (Woodruff) and (5)-Labon Hill. He was born in Jackson County near Rockcastle, West Virginia October 15, 1853. He grew to manhood here and married (44A)-Sidney Cast. He was a railroad employee. He died September, 13, 1912. They had six children:

Fourth Generation

(171)-Lavada, date of birth not known.
(172)-Mary, date of birth not known.
(173)-Rose, date of birth not known.
(174)-Elzina, date of birth not known.
(175)-Anna, date birth not known.
(176)-Warren, date of birth not known.

(45)-ELSIE HILL

Third Generation
The daughter of (5B)-Lizzie (Stover) and (5)-Labon Hill. She was born in West Virginia, probably Jackson County. She grew to womanhood in this section and married (45A)-Randolf Workman. They lived on a farm, Route 3, Leon, West Virginia. They have some children but we have no further record of them.

(46)-ALLMA HILL

Third Generation
The daughter of (5B)-Lizzie (Stover) and (5)-Labon Hill. She was born in West Virginia, probably Jackson County. She grew to womanhood in this section and married (46A)-Mr. Taylor. They live in Charleston, West Virginia. We have no further records concerning her.

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(47)-ISAAC HILL

Third Generation
The first child of (7A)-Rebecca (Thornton) and (7)-Daniel Webster Hill. He was born in West Virginia, probably Putnam County, December 11, 1837. He grew to manhood here and married (47A)-Mary Catherine Waide. They lived in West Virginia a year or more before moving to Iowa with his father. In 1862 the entire family moved on to Oregon by ox team and wagon. He settled on a farm about three miles from Portland and engaged in farming. Isaac Hill was a large man 6 foot 2 and 1/2 inches. They had six children:

Fourth Generation

(177)-John William, date of birth not known.
(178)-Anthony Samuel, date of birth not known.
(179)-Mary Virginia, date of birth-not known.
(180)-Olive, date of birth not known.
(181)-Charles B. date of birth not known.
(182)-Lillian Pearl, date of birth not known.

(48)-BANDRIDGE HILL

Third Generation
The second child of (7A)-Rebecca (Thornton) and (7)-Daniel Webster Hill. He was born in West Virginia, probably Putnam County, May 4, 1838. In his youth he moved with his parents to Wayne County Iowa where he married (48A)-Elizabeth Ann Galoway September 16, 1859. In 1862 the entire family moved on to Oregon by ox team and wagon. Bandridge settled in Marion County and lived there a year and a half then moved to Yamhill County. He owned and operated one of the largest farms in this section in the 1870's and 1880's. He also dealt in high bred horses, cattle and goats. For years he showed his stock at the state fair at Salem, always taking first and second prizes. He was particularly fond of fine horses. He also owned a large grist mill and general store at Dayton, Oregon. His wife Elizabeth Ann, died January 17, 1874. They had six children:

Fourth Generation

(183)-Daniel W. born September 20, 1862.
(184)-Mathina, born May 7, 1865.
(185)-Rebecca Jane, born February 22, 1867.
(186)-Grant W. born May 22, 1869.
(187)-John T. born April 22, 1871
(188)-Mary Alice, born May 10, 1873.

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(48)-BANDRIDGE HILL Continued

Third Generation
After the death of his first wife, Elizabeth Ann Galoway, Bandridge Hill married (48B)-Cordelia Ramsdell, they had four children:

Fourth Generation

(189)-Manly B. born September 20, 1875.
(190)-Margaret, born November 20, 1877.
(191)-Maude A. August 14, 1879.
(192)-Lee Collins, born 1882, month or day not known.

Bandridge Hill died December 4, 1908, age 70 years, 7 months.

(49)-ROXA ANN HILL

Third Generation
The third child of (7A)-Rebecca (Thornton) and (7)-Daniel Webster Hill. She was born in West Virginia, probably Putnam County July 30, 1840. In her youth she moved with her parents to Wayne County, Iowa where she married her teacher (49A)-John R. Kellogg a Fife Major in the civil war. In 1862 she and her husband and her father's entire family moved to Oregon by ox team and wagons. The wagon train encamped over night at Oro Dell, Union County, Oregon and the Kelloggs decided to settle in the near by Grande Ronde valley.

Major Kellogg advised his wife to go on to the Willamette valley with the rest of the family, that he would build them a house and come for her in the spring. She insisted upon staying and sharing the hardships and the two built their home beside a spring and there they spent their remaining days. He died September 5, 1904. She died July 22, 1929, age 89. They had no children of their own but reared at least one other.

The religious and social life of this entire community seemed to revolve around this illustrious pioneer couple. Their niece (185)-Rebecca Jane Kettering of Underwood, Washington has been kind enough to send us, among other records, a nice booklet "Tribute to Major John R. Kellogg" by J. B. Horner and nearly a full page tribute in the La Grande Evening Observer, La Grande Oregon, July 26, 1929 to Roxa Ann Hill Kellogg. We truly regret that space does not permit the entry of both of these magnificent tributes in their entirety but we can do no more than print a few selected passages.

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(49)-ROXA ANN HILL Continued

Third Generation
Excerpts from "Tribute to Major John R. Kellogg" by J. B. Horner: "......There are sermons and sermons, but the greatest sermon a man can preach is a noble life. Mr. Kellogg's life was eloquent with noble deeds peculiarly inspirational, and I am one of a multitude who have constantly felt the need of its elevating power. It was in the midst of the tremendous demonstration of patriotism at La Grande on last Fourth of July, when the veterans marched to fife and drum, that something seemed to say this would be the last time we could witness a march of this character with the old Fife Major in the lead; and while my heart melted within me I stole away and wept like a child.

"..... So we called on him, and we saw through the streaming eyes of his devoted companion that the Angel. of Death was expected in that home. He knew it, and she knew it; but lest the other might not be able to bear up under the terrible ordeal, each tried in vain to keep the secret from the other.

"........On his death bed he sang some of the sweetest songs of his life, for he belonged to the age of song ushered in by Moody and Sankey; he was the Sankey of Oregon. Have you heard him sing? Having heard him, can you ever get away from the influence of his song? East or west, north or south, wherever he went, people enjoyed that indefinable richness, simplicity and earnestness of his song, which floated on angelic wings into the lives of thousands.

"......Like Washington he had no children, that he might be father to all.

"........And while we know that he has laid aside the silvery flute of earth for the golden harp of heaven, we believe that a gleam of sunshine will light our way over the same river, and that we shall meet our friend in a beautiful land, where he has ex­changed the sweet songs of time for the sweeter songs and grander hallelujahs of celestial. choirs. I love to indulge sentiment when it will not lead me astray. Hence, I love to follow the life of this upright man, for it leads me upward. Yea, verily, man may easily follow it up to heaven."

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